Awakening

Elaine Weiner-Reed - Creative License Art Studio (May 2016)
 
       As an artist, my life and creative process are connected. Underpinning my joie de vivre is an analytical mind that never stops trying to comprehend and make sense of human behavior, relationships, and motivations.

     Regardless of the subject matter of an artwork or the resulting effect, during the creative process I am consciously and unconsciously engaged in unraveling mysteries and seeking answers...or if not answers, at least some explanation of a scenario that makes sense.

     I begin each work with an idea. While painting, I give free rein to my intuition, submerging into the activity of painting. Listening to a lively or moody jazz or rock selection (Maynard Ferguson, Miles Davis, Claude Nougaro...) or a haunting nostalgic song of Chimene Badi, I begin each painting with anticipation and joy. Over the following hours or weeks, I alternate between periods of thoughtfully looking at each piece to analyze what is working, and periods of automatism, construction, and deconstruction. Everything that goes into the creation of a painting is critical to the endgame: the message, content, and overall feel of the work.

Elaine Weiner-Reed (EWR) - Red, Black, and Blond - Mixed Media (41 x 61 inches)


Elaine Weiner-Reed (EWR) - Group Dynamics - Mixed Media (35 x 53 inches)


Elaine Weiner-Reed (EWR) - Vision Quest - Mixed Media (26 x 38 inches)


Elaine Weiner-Reed (EWR) - Unraveling Mysteries - Mixed Media (35 x 53 inches)

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Review:


February/March 2014
GALLERY&STUDIO  
(pps. 9, 23)


"Awakening"   

     "One of her ((Basha Maryanska, Curator)) main criteria seems to be selecting artists with fertile imaginations and inexhaustible creative resources such as one sees in the work of the Abstract Expressionist painter Elaine Weiner-Reed.  Although based in Annapolis, Maryland, Weiner-Reed works in the tradition of New York School “action painters” like Willem de Kooning and Grace Hartigan, applying her vigorous brushwork to nonobjective and figurative compositions with equal spontaneity and zest.  Like Hartigan’s famous painting “Delancey Street Brides,” Weiner-Reed’s “Red, Black, and Blond” achieves a successful synthesis of both, with a bold image of a voluptuous woman in a shoulderless red top and black slacks evoked in flowing, succulent strokes.  Although the figures are not defined and her surroundings are indicated in a broad undetailed manner, the picture appears to be a self-portrait, depicting the artist in her studio, the manner in which she merges with her surroundings, suggesting her passionate engagement with her vocation.

     “Here, Weiner- Reed’s ability to suggest so much within the self-imposed limitations of a loose gestural style calls to mind another member of the New York School: Robert de Niro, Sr., late father of the well known actor.  Similarly generalized, yet possessed of individuality nonetheless are the three figures in another canvas entitled “Group Dynamics.”  Working mainly in line, with key patches of color, applied with characteristic vigor, to knit the composition together at key points, Weiner- Reed employs the linear technique to suggest the physical and emotional connections, as well as the inevitable psychological tensions, of family life to which title alludes. Equally formidable in a more formal but no less intense manner are Weiner-Reed’s purely abstract compositions, such as “Vision Quest,” and “Unraveling Mysteries” in which she takes on more inner-directed subjects and metaphysical concerns."
 

-Byron Coleman

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                                                                                                    © 2016 - Elaine Weiner-Reed
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